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From:
Area 51 Mailing List Digest v096.n017, 24 Oct 1996

01 - campbell@ufomind.com (Gl - "Catchers of Heaven" - A Preliminary Review")
02 - Tom Mahood <tmahood@netco - ("Catchers of Heaven" - Unbelievably Bad")
 
 
  From: campbell@ufomind.com (Glenn Campbell, Las Vegas)
  Subject: Catchers of Heaven - A Preliminary Review
  Date: Fri, 18 Oct 1996 14:39:10 -0700
 
  "The Catchers of Heaven: A Trilogy" By Micheal Wolf (1993, 1996)
  (Dorrance Publishing, Tel. 412-288-4543, $24)
 
  Preliminary Review by Glenn Campbell, 10/18/96
  Area 51 Research Center, [http://www.ufomind.com]
 
  I have finally received my copy of "Catchers of Heaven," a novel
  supposedly by a physician who worked with ETs for the government.
  Receiving the book is one thing; reading and decoding it is another.
  It is 402 dense pages of mostly philosophical musings.  I have spent
  several hours with the book, but I cannot say I have read it. I've
  just skimmed it for key words and tried to read the parts that
  pertain to E.T.'s and government programs.
 
  There are a _lot_ of key words here: MJ-12, S4, Dulce, NSA, NPO,
  DARPA, "The Company" (CIA), KGB, Reticulum.  There are praises in
  the book's Dedication for Whitley Strieber, John Mack, David Jacobs,
  Budd Hopkins, Steven Spielberg and many other prominent UFO names,
  including Walt Andrus and Billy Meier (which shows to me a certain
  lack of selectivity).  Is he dropping well-known names just to seek
  credibility? Curiously, I see no mention of Bob Lazar, whose story
  this one seems closest to.
  If I can sum up the book in one word, it is "Strieber-esque".
 
  This is presented as a "roman a clef," a book written as a novel but
  purporting to contain facts that the author cannot otherwise talk
  about --  being, as he claims, under the restrictions of National
  Security.  The author presents himself as a multi-disciplinary
  researcher: M.D. in neurology, PhD in theoretical physics, another
  degree in computer science, jet pilot, etc.  The protagonist has
  done it all: flown recon missions over 'Nam, protected war orphans,
  cloned prototype soldiers in unethical medical experiments, served
  as a courier for the CIA to East Germany, created "organic"
  computers, worked with ET's, etc. Not since James Bond has one man
  done so much.  He is an abductee from the age of 11, and has spent a
  lifetime working on Black projects. He has even worked out his own
  theory of the universe.
 
  The book jacket says only:
 
      Dr. Wolf, Chancellor Emeritus of The New England
      Institute for Advanced Research, maintains memberships
      in The New York Academy of Sciences and the American
      Association for the Advancement of Science, the latter
      as a patron member. He currently resides in Connecticut,
      where he writes and continues his work on a variety of
      projects.
 
  (I wonder how much you have to donate to become a "patron member" of
  AAAS.  $200?)
 
  Dorrance Publishing appears to be a vanity publisher, and the jacket
  says that all royalties from the book will go to the "The Daniel
  Wolf Memorial Foundation for the Children, Inc."  The author hints
  that he is dying and that he has nothing much left to live for
  anyway.  So why doesn't he just come out with it?  Why this
  novelization?
 
  Here are the goals of the book, as stated in the introduction:
 
      The "Catchers of Heaven: A Trilogy" is not a long title
      for a three-volume history of mankind and his place in
      the universe; a history of time in the universe; the
      natural laws and forces of the universe; an argument
      against the Big Bang Theory of creation of the universe;
      and an argument for a new Grand Unified Theory (GUT) of
      everything in the universe.
 
      This work describes the neighbors in the universe that
      have come to visit man and how they are able to get here
      - the nearest neighbor being thirty to thirty-two light
      years away; and why some of these neighbors chose to
      come to this planet (specifically those who have an
      interest, vested or invested, and those who are only
      tourists passing through).
 
      This is an attempt to shed light on the human equation,
      what it means to lose a beloved wife and son; and,
      finally, what is the answer to life?
 
  Needless to say, the book doesn't quite live up to those ambitious
  goals, but that is not to say it is worthless.  As a novel or
  philosophy book, some of it is quite intriguing and thoughtful --
  far more so, at least, than the one-dimensional dreck of William
  Cooper, "Val Valerian," "Dr." Frank Stranges and other pretending
  insiders. At least this guy has a brain. His book is far more
  compelling and readable, I think, than Strieber himself, whose work
  I have never been able to grasp.
 
  The many scientific catch words seem to be used appropriately,
  although I wish the protagonist would go into some technical detail
  on any of his supposed academic specialties. There are hints of
  talented writing here and some real passion for philosophical
  issues. Although this novel could use a lot of editing, the author
  has a distinctive and sophisticated style which suggests to me that
  he has written novels before.
 
  I searched for anything "new" regarding the government UFO cover-up
  (or folklore thereof) and didn't find much that hasn't been
  published before.  Everything the book has to say about aliens and
  government programs could fit in a dozen pages, not the 402 alloted.
  A sample (page 280):
 
      At the meeting, I stood stiffly at the head of a long,
      oak table. The heads of the support teams sat wordlessly
      reading the contents of the prepared briefing manuals,
      the selected briefing papers bound as Assessments. There
      was much to read; I felt increasingly the pressure of
      time.
 
      "Ladies and gentlemen, if I may interrupt for a moment,
      I'd like to take you first to the section entitled, 'The
      Fire-Fight,' when one EBE was killed by a gunshot, a
      sloppy misunderstanding by the colonel in charge of
      guarding the so-called aliens, while there was a
      demonstration of a small anti-matter reactor."
 
      Colonel Etienne DuPont of the French Secret Service
      raised his hand for a question. I had wanted to get this
      awful part of the presentation over with as soon as was
      possible, with no questions taken until the end. He was
      a young-looking man of forty, apparently a little
      apprehensive about a suggested engagement with aliens. I
      nodded and asked what it was he wanted to know.
 
      "Sir, did you say an alien was _killed_?"
 
      I tried to smile, but could not. "I'll answer this, but
      your briefing documents cover everything, and I would
      appreciate any questions to be voiced after the
      presentation, as well as after your perusal of all the
      documents. As to your question, Colonel, yes, one alien
      was killed. It was a power-play on the part of our
      so-called elite military personnel and guards. There
      were two scientists present and the EBEs, specifically,
      the Reticulian Four entities, were demonstrating the 100
      percent power-producing annihilation reaction in a
      relatively small anti-matter reactor, using a
      super-heavy element, bombarding it with protons.
 
      "You must remember that our nuclear bombs, both fission
      and fusion, do not yield anything near 100 percent
      energy, so the power being demonstrated was almost
      unthinkable to the two scientists observing the
      demonstration," I told them.
 
      "The one Ret. Four - for short; you also see them
      designated as the 'Greys' - was doing the display and
      asked first that all rifles and especially the bullets
      in them be removed from the room, and I'm sure all here
      could see the possible implication of a gunshot during
      this display of enormous power. The - and I must stress
      this again - so-called elite military guards refused,
      and in the chaotic disorder and commotion that ensued,
      one alien, the two scientists, and forty-one military
      personnel were killed, simply because the colonel in
      charge of security refused the Grey's request. This
      occurred one May, nineteen hundred seventy-five, in
      Nevada."
 
  So, the question is, Was this book written by someone with "inside
  knowledge" of a government E.T. program?  I can't say.  Even if
  true, a "novelization" of the facts doesn't help much, since the key
  to real research is being able to connect any given claim to our
  existing base of knowledge.  In ufology, anyone can claim anything
  -- that they were abducted, that they worked for a nonexistent
  government program, or even that they are aliens themselves. Because
  of the "para-normal" nature of these claims, you can't prove that
  any of them are false.  All you can say is "I can't pursue that
  right now." What distinguishes the more pursuable stories is the
  presence of specific details that can realistically be connected to
  the known world.
 
  In spite of the many names it drops and the technical words it uses
  competently, this book still lacks enough specific detail to let me
  do anything with it.  About the only way I can think of to
  investigate this book is to check out the background of the author
  himself.  Of course, he insists in the book that the government can
  completely wipe out the indentities of anyone it chooses, posing
  obvious complications for any background check. There is also the
  problem with "fictionalized" truth that you don't know what is
  fiction and what is truth, so you don't know what to check.  About
  the only things stated as fact are on the book jacket, namely that
  he is "Dr." Wolf of the "New England Institute for Advanced
  Research" and that proceeds from the book will be given to "The
  Daniel Wolf Memorial Foundation for the Children, Inc.," which must
  have been registered with a state to get that "Inc." designation.
 
  Alas, the lack of specific claims in the book doesn't give me the
  motivation to look into it right now.  I cannot say that I have
  figured this book out, but I'm more inclined to let things "sift"
  than to actively pursue it myself.  With other investigations
  competing for attention, I'd rate this as a low priority.
 
  I don't carry this book in my own line of catalog items, because I
  sell only products I would personally recommend to my friends, and I
  still haven't decided about this one.
 
  -----------------------------
 
  Copyright (c) 1996, Glenn Campbell, PO Box 448, Rachel, NV 89001.
  May be freely reproduced on the internet provided entire message is
  kept intact, but no hard-copy publication or for-profit use is
  allowed without permission.
 
  +------     U    F    O    M    I    N    D     -------+
  | Glenn Campbell                  campbell@ufomind.com |
  | AREA 51 RESEARCH CENTER - Las Vegas & Rachel, Nevada |
  | UFOs  -  Gov't Secrets  -  Philosophy  -  Psychology |
  |                            Box 448, Rachel, NV 89001 |
  +------------------------------------------------------+
 
  From: Tom Mahood <tmahood@netcom.com>
  Subject: Catchers of Heaven - Unbelievably Bad!
  Date: Mon, 21 Oct 1996 18:51:53 -0700
 
  I finally had a chance to go through "The Catchers of Heaven" by Dr.
  (allegedly) Michael Wolf.  I can't recall when I've read a more bizarre
  book.  It's a rambling stream of (un)consciousness that manages to be very
  articulate and incoherent at the same time.  Just part of the fun is that he
  seems incapable of using only a single title for a chapter.  Some chapters
  have 8 (!!) titles.  Imagine the worst piece of New Age garbage you've ever
  read, then square the effect.
 
  This thing is supposedly a fictionalized account of the author's life.
  While in college, he was recruited by the "Company" (i.e., the CIA) where he
  earned extra book money by acting as an occasional courier to Europe.  While
  keeping his affiliation with the CIA (and eventually the NSA) he completed
  medical school and became a Neurologist.  But that wasn't enough for our
  humble author.  He continued his schooling (he never says where) and
  obtained a Ph.D. in Theoretical Physics.  I was looking to see if he also
  headed up a rock band, in which case we would be dealing with Buckaroo
  Banzai!  Do you get the idea that maybe the guy is some sort of genius?
  Ahhh, THAT'S the point!
 
  So where are the aliens and what does this have to do with Area 51?
  Unfortunately, not much.  About two thirds to three quarters of the book are
  spent with the author whining about his dead wife and son, who were killed
  in a car accident while he happened to be driving.  He escaped with a two
  week coma.  (I speculate they deliberately yanked the wheel to end their
  misery of being related to this clown!)  To hear him describe his
  beyond-perfect family life (at least until kills them mercifully off) makes
  "Leave it to Beaver" look like the Manson Family. Oh yeah, then there's the
  non-sexual, semi-homosexual relationship he enters into with his son's best
  friend, after his son's death.   I can't begin to explain all THAT to you.....
 
  However, every so often, his medication must have kicked in and there are a
  few coherent pages about aliens.  Not many, but a few.  He does mention S-4
  and the mode of operation of the discs, but in a very odd way.  While he
  does mention a few of the elements of the Lazar story, in no instance does
  he add anything at all beyond what is already public knowledge.  Everything
  is EXACTLY as Lazar described, and nothing beyond.  He even precisely
  repeats some of Lazar's terminology, to the point it's all very suspicious.
  I'd expect a few differences in viewpoint or terminology from someone who
  had been in the program for many years.  I should point out he makes only a
  few mentions of things that Lazar has told of.  Lazar's is a far richer
  tale.  But in no case does he mention anything Lazar didn't see or was told.
  Also, curiously, he NEVER mentions Bob Lazar.  Odd, since he's telling the
  same story.
 
  The same occurs with his mention of his activities under the MJ-12 group.
  All the references he makes and terminology he uses is straight out of the
  MJ-12 papers, which if valid, are over 40 years old.  It doesn't seem likely
  that the organization or names of groups would remain the same after the
  amount of public disclosure that has occurred.
 
  And author Wolf seems to have a liking for the movies, beyond his already
  mentioned "Buckaroo Banzai" status.  At one point, he is appalled to
  discover the presence of autopsy tables in alien receiving areas having tie
  down straps.  He realizes you only need straps if what you're slicing an'
  dicing is still wigglin'.  Anyone remember that same scene out of the movie
  "Starman"?  Later in the book he remarks, " Humans are at their best when
  things are at their worst", a line ripped off directly from "Starman".
 
  A final curiosity for your consideration.  The author claims to be terminal
  with colon cancer that has already metastasized to his hip.  That actually
  is a pretty nasty situation and at that point you are pretty close to
  headin' into the light.  However the book was first printed in 1993, and
  printed and copyrighted again in 1996.  It would seem this guy is lingering
  around a record amount of time for someone in his condition.
 
  Bottom line:  This guy (whoever the Hell he is) tells us nothing new at all.
  If anything, the wild manner in which this is written lessens what little
  credibility the topics he touches upon might have already had.  This book is
  a major waste of time to read and a waste of money to buy.  I cannot begin
  to explain why this book was even printed. Aside from that, it was great!
 
 Tom



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